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A republic--if we can keep it

Author: Lawrence W Reed; Burton W Folsom; Foundation for Economic Education, inc.
Publisher: Irvington, N.Y. : Foundation for Economic Education, ©2011.
Edition/Format:   Book : Essay : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Economics as it is taught today is replete with fallacies. So is history. Combine the two into Economic History and you frequently get a witch's brew of mumbo jumbo. The Industrial Revolution was a setback for workers. Free markets caused monopoly and exploitation. Government intervention was required for economic growth and for economic recovery. These are but a few of the many misconceptions that constantly need  Read more...
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Details

Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Lawrence W Reed; Burton W Folsom; Foundation for Economic Education, inc.
ISBN: 9781572460317 1572460318
OCLC Number: 815535080
Description: 340 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Contents: The holiday that isn't --
The Founders, the Constitution, and the historians --
Madison's veto sets a precedent --
Principled parties --
Andrew Johnson and the Constitution --
A Supreme Court to be proud of --
Two Presidents, two philosophies, and two different outcomes --
Andrew Mellon : the entrepreneur as politician --
Where are the omelets? --
The times that tried men's economic souls --
The forgotten robber barons --
Teddy Roosevelt and the progressive vision of history --
Of meat and myth --
Our Presidents and the national debt --
The progressive income tax in U.S. history --
Cigarette taxes are hazardous to our health --
A man who knew the value of life and liberty --
Scotland : seven centuries since William Wallace --
Happy birthday, Adam Smith! --
A man who didn't "grow" in office --
Prophets of property --
Wilfrid Laurier : a Canadian statesman --
From crystal palace to white elephant in 100 years --
From Kleenex to zippers : the unpredictable results of entrepreneurs --
A camera reaches 100 --
Charles Schwab and the steel industry --
Herbert Dow and predatory pricing --
Witch-hunting for robber barons : the Standard Oil story --
John D. Rockefeller and his enemies --
It wasn't government that fixed your clock --
History for sale : Why not? --
John Jacob Astor and the fur trade : testing the role of government --
Why did the National Road fail? --
Should government build the railroads? --
Death by public works --
The origin of American farm subsidies --
Lessons from the first airplane --
Subsidies hurt recipients, too --
A tribute to the jitney --
In the grip of madness --
Great myths of the Great Depression --
The 1932 bait-and-switch --
Child labor and the British Industrial Revolution --
Government, poverty and self-reliance : wisdom from 19th century Presidents --
The Silver Panic --
Public money for private charity --
Equality, markets, and morality --
The inspiring story of Thomas Clarkson --
The liberty tradition among Black Americans --
The costs of segregation to the Detroit Tigers --
Elijah McCoy and Berry Gordy : ingenuity overcomes --
The story of Nicholas Winton --
James Madison : the Constitutional War President --
The economic costs of the Civil War --
Spanish-American War : death, taxes, and incompetence --
Don't expect much from politics.
Responsibility: Lawrence W. Reed, Burton W. Folsom, Jr.

Abstract:

Economics as it is taught today is replete with fallacies. So is history. Combine the two into Economic History and you frequently get a witch's brew of mumbo jumbo. The Industrial Revolution was a setback for workers. Free markets caused monopoly and exploitation. Government intervention was required for economic growth and for economic recovery. These are but a few of the many misconceptions that constantly need revisiting, and are addressed within this volume. The authors recognize that both economics and history must be about much more than numbers. That's why many of the offerings here focus on the interesting contributions of people who changed the course of events. One of the essential points we hope readers of this anthology will come away with is the critical importance of specific individuals in shaping the course of the amorphous collective known as "society."
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