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Defending white democracy : the making of a segregationist movement and the remaking of racial politics, 1936-1965

Author: Jason Morgan Ward
Publisher: Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, ©2011.
Edition/Format:   Book : State or province government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"After the Supreme Court ruled school segregation unconstitutional in 1954, southern white backlash seemed to explode overnight. Journalists profiled the rise of a segregationist movement committed to preserving the "southern way of life" through a campaign of massive resistance. In Defending White Democracy, Jason Morgan Ward reconsiders the origins of this white resistance, arguing that southern conservatives  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: History
Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Jason Morgan Ward
ISBN: 9780807835135 0807835137
OCLC Number: 711043308
Description: xi, 252 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Contents: Agitating falsely the race problem --
The white south's "double V" --
From white supremacists to "segregationists" --
Nationalizing race and southernizing freedom --
The rhetoric of responsible resistance --
The southern "minority" and the silent majority.
Responsibility: Jason Morgan Ward.

Abstract:

"After the Supreme Court ruled school segregation unconstitutional in 1954, southern white backlash seemed to explode overnight. Journalists profiled the rise of a segregationist movement committed to preserving the "southern way of life" through a campaign of massive resistance. In Defending White Democracy, Jason Morgan Ward reconsiders the origins of this white resistance, arguing that southern conservatives began mobilizing against civil rights some years earlier, in the era before World War II, when the New Deal politics of the mid-1930s threatened the monopoly on power that whites held in the South. As Ward shows, years before "segregationist" became a badge of honor for civil rights opponents, many white southerners resisted racial change at every turn--launching a preemptive campaign aimed at preserving a social order that they saw as under siege. By the time of the Brown decision, segregationists had amassed an arsenal of tested tactics and arguments to deploy against the civil rights movement in the coming battles. Connecting the racial controversies of the New Deal era to the more familiar confrontations of the 1950s and 1960s, Ward uncovers a parallel history of segregationist opposition that mirrors the new focus on the long civil rights movement and raises troubling questions about the enduring influence of segregation's defenders."--Provided by publisher.
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"Ward gives a clear and fair accounting of this motley crew's thinking about how to block unwelcome changes. One gains new appreciation for the courage of white southern dissenters then and for the Read more...

 
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